WHO ARE WE ANIMED AT?

61% of rural producers in Colombia are small-scale

Only 6% belong to a production cooperative.

Only 24% claim to have received technical assistance.

Only 29% have machinery.

43% carry out some kind of production for self-sustenance.

Source National Agricultural Census 2014 DANE

61% of rural producers in Colombia are small-scale

Only 6% belong to a production cooperative.

Only 24% claim to have received technical assistance.

Only 29% have machinery.

43% carry out some kind of production for self-sustenance.

Source National Agricultural Census 2014 DANE

As a country, we need to recognize the potential of the rural sector in order to achieve greater social development and growth.

As a country, we need to recognize the potential of the rural sector in order to achieve greater social development and growth.

LIFE STORIES

LIFE STORIES

“Previously, we farmers were scattered, we weren’t organized. And forming cooperatives is the best thing we could have done. Thanks to the training we have received, now, for example, we produce more milk on less land, and that helps us to protect the environment because we don’t expand the agricultural frontier.”

Diary Producer, Valle del Paletará, Cauca

“The Wayúu people have a sense of belonging. What we have learnt with the Alpina Foundation has been very important because it provides knowledge for right here, for the community. Thanks to that knowledge we have reduced animal mortality in our ranch.”

Wayúu participant, Alta Guajira

“I think that the greatest change we have seen is in the relationships with people, with the community and in everything to do with understanding that, in spite of differences, when there is a shared goal, we can speak the same language, we can discuss things and pick the option which benefits us because it has been discussed, because the pros and cons have been laid out and not because it has been chosen based on points or voted on. That has been the greatest gain: understanding, talking”.

Diego de Jesús Arboleda, El Tambo, Cauca.

“Building the cooperative was difficult, everyone was pulling in different directions. The truckers would say: “How much are you going to pay us?” And I would say to them: “Hold on a second, who pays you at home? Nobody. This new cooperative is ours, the products are ours, we have to earn the minimum that we can, we need it to be an extra income and understand it as something that we did not have before”

Benjamín Castañeda, Alta Guajira